Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


GRAY, IN BLACK AND WHITE

Play-by-play man Richard Keys and color commentator Andy Gray,  Sky Sports’  leading soccer voices since the launch of the English Premier League in 1992, have been ousted over sexist remarks that have triggered a debate in Britain over the role of women in what is a male-dominated sport.

Keys resigned under pressure one day after Gray was sacked.  Both issued public apologies.

The two thought their microphones were off before a Wolverhampton-Liverpool match telecast when they questioned whether a female assistant referee knew the offside rule.  Keys predicted that the lineswoman, Sian Massey, would make a mistake during the game (she actually nailed a critical offside call), and Gray used an expletive in referring to Wendy Toms, the first woman to officiate in the Premier League.  Keys piled on by criticising West Ham executive Karren Brady, known for her complaints of sexual discrimation in the soccer media.  Then the off-air remarks were leaked–perhaps by someone within Sky–to a Sunday newspaper.  [January 26]

Comment:  Keys isn’t well known in these parts, but Gray, thanks largely to his work for ESPN as a color man during the 2010 World Cup, is.  And Gray was a misogynistic misadventure waiting to happen:  a reputation as a playboy backed by a ledger sheet of five children by four women (for the record, two were wives).   

Perhaps Gray will be able to resuscitate his career across The Pond, but it’s doubtful he’ll be back for ESPN’s coverage of the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.  And so much the better.  While Gray’s resume as a striker, from the mid-’70s to the mid-’80s, was impressive–20 games, seven goals for Scotland and many more goals for Everton, Aston Villa and Wolverhampton–to American viewers he wasn’t much more than that gravelly voiced truck driver with the thick Glaswegian brogue who happened to wander into a broadcast booth.

If Gray will be missed here, it’s because in a world in which English play-by-play men are for some reason routinely paired with Scottish color men, Gray was one of the few Scotsmen whose comments could be deciphered by American ears.

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