Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


THE HONEYMOON BEGINETH

New U.S. National Team coach Juergen Klinsmann named a 22-man roster for the August 10 friendly with Mexico at Philadelphia’s Lincoln Financial Field.  The meeting will be the first between the rivals since Mexico’s 4-2 romp over the Americans in the 2011 CONCACAF Gold Cup final at the Rose Bowl in July.  It also will be the first friendly between the two sides in three years.  [August 4]

Comment:  Let the honeymoon begin, or as former Mexico coach Ricardo LaVolpe once said of the U.S. National Team, as quoted in Soccer Stories: Anecdotes, Oddities, Lore and Amazing Feats:  “Here, everyone is interested in baseball and American football and many people didn’t even know that a soccer match was being played today.  So it’s easy for them, because they aren’t playing under any pressure.  My mother, my grandmother, my great-grandmother could play in a team like that.”

As games go, this is about as meaningless as it comes when it’s the U.S. and Mexico.  Klinsmann will have a long look at players he’s wondered about during his five years as U.S.-coach-in-waiting, and the process will continue next month, with friendlies against Costa Rica at the Home Depot Center in Carson, CA, and Belgium at King Badouin Stadium in Brussels. 

It doesn’t matter if the U.S. goes down again, 4-2, in Philly.  It doesn’t matter if the U.S. performs poorly against another World Cup qualifier opponent, Costa Rica, or extends its limp record against European teams in Europe with its trip to Brussels.  And it doesn’t matter because these are friendlies and the U.S. coach is former German star Juergen Klinsmann, the biggest name ever to coach the national team.  

Klinsmann’s resume begins with a World Cup championship in 1990, and he lifted the 1996 European Championship trophy as captain.  To put Klinsmann’s credentials as a player in perspective, he scored 47 goals in 108 international  appearances;  the total number of caps earned by his 34 predecessors at the U.S. helm total 35, and it would be far fewer were it not for future NASL commissioner Phil Woosnam, who played 17 times for Wales in the early ’60s.  (The others:  Bob Millar, two, for the U.S.; Erno Schwarz, two for Hungary; Bob Kehoe, four, for the U.S.; Gordon Bradley, one, for the U.S.; Walt Chyzowych, three, for the U.S.; Bob Gansler, five, for the U.S.; and Bruce Arena, one, for the U.S.)

As a coach, while he later failed to click at his former club, Bayern Munich, what most will remember him for was his work in transforming Germany at the 2006 World Cup.  Despite being the hosts, the young Germans were expected by their own countrymen to crash early but instead played an entertaining and inspired brand of soccer in reaching the semifinals.

Beyond that, Klinsmann seems to have come out of Central Casting, had the call gone out for a foreign-born U.S. National Team coach.  Young, articulate, bright enough to negotiate his own contracts while with AS Monaco and on other stops during his highly successful 17-year playing career.  Lives in Huntington Beach, CA, with his American wife and their two very American children.  Thoroughly familiar with the current national team pool, the American mentality and the American soccer system.    

As a result, expect Klinsmann to get the kid-glove treatment for quite some time from the those covering the national team, a press corps never known for making life difficult for any previous U.S. coach–even the prickly Arena or the equally prickly Alkis Panagoulias.  To put it another way, Klinsmann’s relationship with the media will make the bucolic Bora Milutinovic era resemble the height of rancor and malevolence.

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