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A REVOLUTION ACROSS THE SEA

The owners of Liverpool FC have backed down from plans for a significant hike in ticket prices and apologized to the club’s fans, insisting they are not greedy.

The club’s supporters were outraged when they learned recently that some tickets for next season would be increased to $112 (that’s 77 pounds).  At Liverpool’s next match at Anfield, on February 6 against Sunderland, 10,000 spectators staged a walkout in the 77th minute.  Their club was cruising along with a 2-0 lead at the time, but Liverpool gave up two late goals in front of thousands of empty seats and limped away with a point.

“On behalf of everyone at Fenway Sports Group and Liverpool Football Club, we would like to apologize for the distress caused by our ticket pricing plan for the 2016-17 season,” read a letter to fans by ownership, which announced the most expensive ticket will remain frozen at 59 pounds (that’s about $86).

The fan revolt came at a time when ticket prices throughout the English Premier League are on the rise despite clubs being increasingly less reliant on fan admissions.  Next year, a new three-year television deal will kick in in which clubs will share $12 billion.

“There is a problem here where some teams and some clubs put up prices very rapidly every year, even though some of the money for football actually comes through the sponsorship and the equipment,” British Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons the day of Liverpool’s backdown, in response to a question about the prospect of walkouts elsewhere in the EPL.  [February 10]

Comment:  Fan power, on a scale unknown in the United States.

American sports fans have every reason to follow suit.  According to Team Marketing Report, the average ticket in the National Football League, whose teams play eight home games each, is in the neighborhood of $82.  In the National Hockey League (82 games), it’s more than $62; in the National Basketball Association (41 games), $54; in Major League Baseball (81 games), $28.  Which means a family of four in the rapidly shrinking U.S. middle class cannot afford to attend a game.  And these are leagues, like the EPL, whose revenue from TV and licensing dwarfs the money that comes in from the box office.

But these fans won’t revolt.  That’s not the American way.  Or at least American sports fans are completely unorganized compared to their soccer colleagues overseas.  Soccer fans sing and chant for 90 minutes each weekend; they stand and turn their backs, literally, on their team when it plays poorly; their pressure gets coaches fired and club presidents replaced.  The same week that Fenway Sports Group was furiously back-pendaling, in Germany fans of Borussia Dortmund, angered over an increase in ticket prices, threw tennis balls onto the field during a match and displayed a sign, “Football Must Be More Affordable.”  Americans?  Over the past 35 years, after player strikes or lockouts that have affected all four sports, outraged American fans can’t pull off even a limp boycott or other half-hearted demonstration to make their displeasure known.

Liverpool’s owners, in particular, had better hope that American fans remain sheep-like.  Fenway Sports Group–headed by John Henry, Tom Werner and Mike Gordon–also owns baseball’s Boston Red Sox, whose fans are among the most passionate in the world and where ticket prices average $52.  Henry and his pals were admittedly shaken by the Liverpool walkout, and what better place for gouged American ticket buyers to shake their stupor than the home of the original American revolution?

As for the one sports league here where large blocks of the fans are loyal, loud, highly organized, feeling empowered and quite capable of a walkout or other, similar action if displeased, Major League Soccer tickets average a still-reasonable $28 and don’t seem in danger of a startling price hike anytime soon.  As American sports fans go, MLS clubs, including the New England Revolution, are best to leave them undisturbed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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