Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


A REVOLUTION ACROSS THE SEA

The owners of Liverpool FC have backed down from plans for a significant hike in ticket prices and apologized to the club’s fans, insisting they are not greedy.

The club’s supporters were outraged when they learned recently that some tickets for next season would be increased to $112 (that’s 77 pounds).  At Liverpool’s next match at Anfield, on February 6 against Sunderland, 10,000 spectators staged a walkout in the 77th minute.  Their club was cruising along with a 2-0 lead at the time, but Liverpool gave up two late goals in front of thousands of empty seats and limped away with a point.

“On behalf of everyone at Fenway Sports Group and Liverpool Football Club, we would like to apologize for the distress caused by our ticket pricing plan for the 2016-17 season,” read a letter to fans by ownership, which announced the most expensive ticket will remain frozen at 59 pounds (that’s about $86).

The fan revolt came at a time when ticket prices throughout the English Premier League are on the rise despite clubs being increasingly less reliant on fan admissions.  Next year, a new three-year television deal will kick in in which clubs will share $12 billion.

“There is a problem here where some teams and some clubs put up prices very rapidly every year, even though some of the money for football actually comes through the sponsorship and the equipment,” British Prime Minister David Cameron told the House of Commons the day of Liverpool’s backdown, in response to a question about the prospect of walkouts elsewhere in the EPL.  [February 10]

Comment:  Fan power, on a scale unknown in the United States.

American sports fans have every reason to follow suit.  According to Team Marketing Report, the average ticket in the National Football League, whose teams play eight home games each, is in the neighborhood of $82.  In the National Hockey League (82 games), it’s more than $62; in the National Basketball Association (41 games), $54; in Major League Baseball (81 games), $28.  Which means a family of four in the rapidly shrinking U.S. middle class cannot afford to attend a game.  And these are leagues, like the EPL, whose revenue from TV and licensing dwarfs the money that comes in from the box office.

But these fans won’t revolt.  That’s not the American way.  Or at least American sports fans are completely unorganized compared to their soccer colleagues overseas.  Soccer fans sing and chant for 90 minutes each weekend; they stand and turn their backs, literally, on their team when it plays poorly; their pressure gets coaches fired and club presidents replaced.  The same week that Fenway Sports Group was furiously back-pendaling, in Germany fans of Borussia Dortmund, angered over an increase in ticket prices, threw tennis balls onto the field during a match and displayed a sign, “Football Must Be More Affordable.”  Americans?  Over the past 35 years, after player strikes or lockouts that have affected all four sports, outraged American fans can’t pull off even a limp boycott or other half-hearted demonstration to make their displeasure known.

Liverpool’s owners, in particular, had better hope that American fans remain sheep-like.  Fenway Sports Group–headed by John Henry, Tom Werner and Mike Gordon–also owns baseball’s Boston Red Sox, whose fans are among the most passionate in the world and where ticket prices average $52.  Henry and his pals were admittedly shaken by the Liverpool walkout, and what better place for gouged American ticket buyers to shake their stupor than the home of the original American revolution?

As for the one sports league here where large blocks of the fans are loyal, loud, highly organized, feeling empowered and quite capable of a walkout or other, similar action if displeased, Major League Soccer tickets average a still-reasonable $28 and don’t seem in danger of a startling price hike anytime soon.  As American sports fans go, MLS clubs, including the New England Revolution, are best to leave them undisturbed.

 

 

 

 

 

 



THE UEFA CHAMPIONS LEAGUE’S SAME GAME

Atletico Madrid, behind goals by Adrian Lopez, Diego Costa and Arda Turan, recovered from a scoreless draw at home in the first leg to pound Chelsea, 3-1, at Stamford Bridge to win its UEFA Champions League semifinal series, setting up an all-Spanish final May 24 in Lisbon.

The victory comes a day after Real Madrid humbled defending champ Bayern Munich, 4-0, on a pair of goals each by Sergio Ramos and Cristiano Ronaldo and won its home-and-home set by a 5-0 aggregate.

The final, at Benfica’s massive Estadio de Luz, will mark the first time that teams from the same city have met for Europe’s biggest club prize.  Since the European Champions’ Cup became the UEFA Champions League in 1992, four finals have pitted clubs from the same country:  2000, Real Madrid 3, Valencia 0, at the Stade de France outside Paris; 2003, AC Milan 0, Juventus 0 (Milan on PKs), at Old Trafford in Manchester; 2008, Manchester United 1, Chelsea 1 (United on PKs) at Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium; and 2013, Bayern Munich 2, Borussia Dortmund 1, at Wembley Stadium in London.

Real Madrid, a finalist for the 13th time, will be seeking an unprecedented 11th European champions title.  Atletico, which last appeared in a final 40 years ago–losing to Bayern Munich–will be playing in its second final.  [April 30]

Comment:  Like Spanish soccer?  You’d better.

(Full disclosure:  This writer likes Spanish soccer.)

This derby showdown–to be played more than 300 miles from Madrid–will be the fifth this season for the two teams, and the sixth since Atletico defeated Real in last May’s Copa del Rey final, ending a 14-year, 25-match winless streak against its rival.  In La Liga, Atletico, the current frontrunner, won at Real, 1-0, in September and tied at home, 1-1, last month; Real swept their Copa matches in February by an overall 5-0.

It raises the question, what will this grand finale prove?

Sometimes, these things work.  Last year’s UEFA Champions League final was an entertaining advertisement for German soccer.  But for those who want to see a real contrast in styles, a meeting of sides that don’t know one another too well, it often does not.

There’s no going back to the days when the European Champions’ Cup was true to its name and involved only defending league champions.  This year’s competition was open to a whopping 76 clubs, including a handful from the more powerful nations who dazzled the soccer world the previous season by finishing fourth in their league.  Of course, this is about money–lots of it.  Clubs that qualified for the group stage automatically pocketed $11.9 million; maximum points in the group would bring in another $8.3 million.  The payout for an appearance in the knockout rounds began at $4.8 million.  As for the final, one of the Madrids will walk home with an additional $14.5 million.  And the public doesn’t seem put off by a same-country final:  Bayern Munich-Borussia Dortmund last year attracted a global television audience of 360 million–better than three Super Bowls.

But from a sporting perspective, the UEFA has both turned its prime club championship into the impossible dream for dozens of its member associations and reduced its secondary competition–once known as the UEFA Cup and now known as the Europa League–into an afterthought for all but the most ardent fans.

As for the “champion” credentials of this year’s two finalists, Real Madrid qualified for the 2013-14 Champions League by finishing second to FC Barcelona a year ago, a whopping 15 points off the pace; Atletico was third, a dot in the rear-view mirror at 24 points back.

 



AN ADVERTISEMENT FOR THE GERMAN GAME ON AMERICAN TV

Bayern Munich defeated Borussia Dortmund, 2-1, at London’s Wembley Stadium on a last-minute goal by Dutch star Arjen Robben to win the first all-German UEFA Champions League final in history.

Munich, losers of five of its previous six finals but a five-time Euro champion overall, is on track to pull off a rare treble.  Already runaway winners of the Bundesliga, the new European champs will be decided favorites when they face VfB Stuttgart in the German Cup final on June 1 in Berlin.

After surviving considerable early pressure from Dortmund to produce some promising chances, Munich opened the scoring after an hour on a goal by striker Mario Mandzukic, set up by a Robben pass across the goalie box.  Dortmund, which went into the match 1-2-2 against Bayern in all competitions this season, got level on Ilkay Guendogan’s penalty kick eight minutes later after defender Dante’s reckless challenge on Marco Reus.  Dante, cautioned earlier, was lucky not to have been sent off by Italian referee Nicola Rizzoli.

Munich nearly ended it with a heart-stopping shot by Thomas Mueller that Dortmund defender Neven Subotic hooked out of the goalmouth.  But Robben, whose penalty-kick attempt in overtime of last year’s Euro final  against Chelsea was saved by Petr Cech, willed the ball past Borussia goalkeeper Roman Weidenfeller from eight yards to cap a move begun by Franck Ribery.  [May 25]

Comment:  An intriguing, entertaining, end-to-end match that featured plenty of chances, spectacular goalkeeping by Weidenfeller and Germany’s No. 1, Manuel Neuer, and, given the familiarity between the opponents, little gamesmanship and just 18 fouls.

A wonderful showcase for European soccer, but more than that a valuable showcase for German soccer.  And certainly a reminder to Americans that there’s more to the game overseas than a steady diet of English Premier League telecasts and highlight clips of Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo.  Typically solid and stolid, the Bundesliga is short on glamor names (unless they’re home grown), short on the scandals that regularly plague countries like Italy, short on disorganization (Dortmund’s near-bankruptcy eight years ago aside) and long on attendance (a world-best average turnout that regularly tops 40,000 a game).  And despite the never-ending specter of 22-time Bundesliga winner Bayern Munich, Germany has had six different champs over the past 20 years, more than England and Spain and just as many as Italy.

Have German clubs supplanted Spain as the darling of international soccer?  Bayern Munich, after all, demolished the world’s most skillful side, FC Barcelona, by an astounding 7-0 aggregate in the UEFA Champions League semifinals, while Dortmund, harkening back to its 1997 Euro championship, outlasted Real Madrid, 4-3.  Perhaps not.  German power, speed and that one telling pass isn’t likely to top Xavi to Iniesta to Messi and a gentle tap-in.  But the Bundesliga deserves to be part of the discussion.