Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


GERMANY DESTROYS, SAVES WORLD CUP

In the most shocking semifinal in World Cup history, Germany built a 5-0 halftime lead and went on to humiliate host and five-time champion Brazil, 7-1, before a stunned and tearful partisan crowd of 58,141 at Estadio Mineirao.

Thomas Mueller ignited the rout with a side-volleyed goal off a corner kick in the 11th minute, and the opening barrage wouldn’t end until Sami Khedira’s strike in the 29th.  In between, Miroslav Klose scored in the 23rd minute–his 16th–to pass Brazil’s Ronaldo as the all-time World Cup scoring leader; and Toni Kroos put the match away with goals in the 24th and 26th minutes.

With the Brazilian defense in shambles and on the verge of capitulation, German substitute Andre Schurrle plunged the dagger in twice more, in the 69th and 79th minutes.  Brazil’s Oscar scored a consolation goal in the 90th, moments after Germany’s Mesut Ozil missed an easy chance that would’ve finished off the clock and made the final score 8-0.

The evening began in a frenzied atmosphere as Brazil fans tried to urge on their team, which was missing injured superstar Neymar and suspended captain Thiago Silva.  After a high-octane start to the match, the Brazilian defense, led by David Luiz in Silva’s absence, collapsed, and following Schurrle’s second goal the yellow-and-green-clad spectators began to cheer every pass completed by Germany.

The loss was Brazil’s first at home in a dozen years and its first at home in a competitive match since 1975, a string of 62 games.  It was Brazil’s heaviest defeat since a 6-0 loss in Rio in the 1920 Copa America to Uruguay, which would go on to win the 1924 and ’28 Olympic soccer tournaments and the first World Cup in 1930.  It was the biggest margin of victory in a World Cup semifinal since West Germany’s 6-1 flattening of Austria in 1954.  And it also was the biggest World Cup blow-out since an equally ruthless German side crushed Saudi Arabia, 8-0, in a first-round match in 2002 in Sapporo, Japan.  Perhaps most galling to Brazilians:  Germany is now the highest scoring nation in World Cup history with 223 goals, overtaking–yes–Brazil.

Comment I:  The Germans may very well have spoiled the party that has been this wonderful World Cup.  Hard to believe that the host nation will still be in a Carnaval mood for the remaining five days after this shocking fiasco.  On the other hand, Germany may have erased fears that this will be the World Cup in which an outstanding team never emerges.  The final is yet to be played, but most observers would now concede that the Germans, with a solid performance Sunday, would be worthy champions.

Comment II:  For the sake of Saturday’s third-place match in Brasilia, root for Argentina to beat the Netherlands in Sao Paulo in the other semifinal.  Otherwise, it will be the sullen Brazilians facing their arch rivals in a consolation game neither side wants to play, and what is usually an open, carefree exhibition of soccer could turn into something ugly.

Comment III:  Another of the beauties of soccer on display in Belo Horizonte:  No time-outs.  Coach Luiz Felipe Scolari and his shell-shocked defense would have loved a two- or three-minute break to regroup midway through the first half, but this isn’t basketball or gridiron football.  It was up to David Luiz and his mates to figure it out on the fly, and they could not.

 

 

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