Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


DONOVAN’S IMMEDIATE F-U TO KLINSMANN

Landon Donovan became Major League Soccer’s all-time scoring leader, producing two goals to lead the Los Angeles Galaxy to a 4-1 rout of the Philadelphia Union at the StubHub Center in Carson, Calif., three days after the one-time U.S. captain was left off the national team roster for the 2014 World Cup.

With his 135th and 136th career goals, the 32-year-old Donovan brushed past Jeff Cunningham in 54 fewer appearances, although the Jamaican-American, now retired, scored his 134 in 3,907 fewer minutes (about 43 90-minute matches).  Rounding out the MLS top 10 are Jaime Moreno (Bolivia, 133), Ante Razov (U.S., 114), Jason Kreis (U.S., 108), Dwayne De Rosario (Canada, 103), Taylor Twellman (U.S., 101), Edson Buddle (U.S., 99), Carlos Ruiz (Guatemala, 88), and Roy Lassiter (U.S., 88).   [May 26]

Comment:  It took only a little more than 72 hours, but Donovan delivered the ultimate response to U.S. coach Juergen Klinsmann and did it with a flair, scoring twice and adding an assist after going his first seven games of the Galaxy season without scoring.

Of course, it’s certainly not going to make Klinsmann reconsider his decision.  In fact, he’s painted himself into such a corner that if any of the forwards or midfielders among his final 23 is injured, he can’t possibly replace him with Donovan.  As for the goals themselves, they were practically sitters, with striker Robbie Keane playing a large part.

Still, it was difficult not to root for Donovan, who had hoped to become the first American to appear in four World Cups.

At training the day before, Donovan did his level best to suppress his anger and disappointment while talking with the media.  “I think I was one of the better players in (U.S.) camp,” he said, using measured tones.  “If I had gone in and didn’t think I deserved it, then I can live with that, but that’s not the case here.”

And after scoring the goal four minutes into the second half that pushed him past Cunningham on the all-time list, as Donovan skidded on the turf and was engulfed by jubilant teammates while a crowd of 21,000 chanted “USA!”, the moment was nothing short of cathartic.  But as the player himself would be the first to admit, it was only a moment.  He’ll be wondering “What if?” for the next seven weeks and long after that.

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SO-CALLED ‘BECKHAM EXPERIMENT’ HAS BEEN WORTH IT

A pair of two-time Major League Soccer champions, the Houston Dynamo and Los Angeles Galaxy, will meet Sunday, November 20, before a sellout crowd at the Home Depot Center outside Los Angeles in the 2011 MLS Cup final.  Kickoff will be at 9 p.m. EST/6 p.m. PST (ESPN and Galavision).  [November 13]

Comment:  The game could mark David Beckham’s final appearance in the U.S., and that’s not a good thing.

The 36-year-old English icon’s five-year, $32.5 million contract with the Galaxy expires at the end of the year, and among Beckham’s reported suitors are Paris Saint-Germain, Tottenham Hotspur and even Queens Park Rangers.

If he leaves, despite the Galaxy’s reported interest in re-signing him, what sort of grade does the so-called “Beckham Experiment”–the title of a rather premature book on his MLS adventure published a couple of years ago–deserve?

Call it a high “B”; not quite a low “A”.   That’s an “A-” for overall effect, dragged down by an “S” (satisfactory) for effort.

There were just as many highs as lows over the five-year period.  More than a quarter-million Galaxy/No. 23 jerseys were sold before Beckham was even introduced as a member of the Galaxy, a media event that attracted 700 journalists.  As advertised, there were memorable free kicks that produced goals, and that crowd of 66,000 that poured into Giants Stadium to see the man with the educated right foot make his Big Apple debut.  There also, however, were injuries, plus the controversial loans to AC Milan and training spells with Arsenal and Tottenham that caused many to question Beckham’s commitment to his American team.  The collapse of  the much-vaunted Beckham youth academy in L.A. didn’t help.  So mixed has been the Beckham legacy in MLS that he earned–or was saddled with–the 2011 MLS Comeback Player of the Year award for assisting on 15 goals in 26 games a year after a torn Achilles limited him to just seven league appearances in 2010.  Oh, and no MLS championships or U.S. National Open Cups or CONCACAF Champions League trophies.

Nevertheless, Beckham will forever be linked with a brief period in MLS history when things went from flat to positive, from indifference to optimism.  The year before Beckham’s arrival, the league had 12 teams, too many of them troubled.  The charter U.S. internationals and key foreign starts like Carlos Valderrama and Marco Etcheverry who had given the teams their initial identities back in 1996 had retired.  It wasn’t, to quote Rodney Marsh’s assessment of English soccer in the early ’70s, “A gray game played on gray days by gray men,” but it was close. 

The creation of the so-called Beckham Rule–the introduction of the designated player exception that allowed teams to reach beyond their salary cap and sign marquee foreign players like Cuauhtemoc Blanco, Denilson (sorry, FC Dallas), Thierry Henry, Rafael Marquez and, most recently, Robbie Keane–changed all that.  Beckham’s arrival and how it lured other big names to MLS added the necessary flesh and blood to the brick and mortar as MLS grew by six clubs and added an impressive list of soccer-specific stadiums.

Most Americans aren’t aware that MLS (17,872) has surpassed the NBA (17,323) and NHL (17,132) in average attendance; that the expansion team fee has ballooned from $10 million, pre-Beckham, to $40 million; that the league’s most recent TV rights deal, with outsider NBC, hit $30 million for three years.  What they do know is that they can name one soccer player–David Beckham–where before they didn’t know Tab Ramos from Jamie Moreno from Mike Petke.  Back when the league was just trying to gain any sort of traction, back when the Galaxy was 11th out of 13 teams in 2007 (9-14-7) and 13th out of 14 the following year (8-13-9), people were talking and writing about Becks, or at least the photogenic Becks and wife Posh.

And that’s why Beckham will be missed if he chooses to close out his playing career elsewhere.  If and when he goes, don’t count on the general American public and the typical U.S. sports columnist or commentator to magically shift their attention to Dwayne De Rosario or David Ferreira or even Henry.   In that sense, Beckham has proved to be irreplaceable.