Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


WHO WAS THE USA’S BEST PLAYER IN 2011?

Some 200 journalists from across the nation are submitting ballots to decide which U.S. National Team member will be the 2011 Futbol de Primera Player of the Year.

Sponsored by FDP, the exclusive radio broadcaster of the 2014 World Cup in the United States, the award–the most prestigious annual honor in American soccer–goes to the best player who appeared in at least three matches for the U.S. in the calendar year.  Those who qualified are Juan Agudelo, Jozy Altidore, Kyle Beckerman, Alejandro Bedoya, Carlos Bocanegra, Michael Bradley, Timmy Chandler, Steve Cherundolo, Clint Dempsey, Landon Donovan, Maurice Edu, Clarence Goodson, Tim Howard,  Jermaine Jones, Sacha Kljestan, Eric Lichaj, Oguchi Onyewu, Michael Orozco Fiscal, Tim Ream, Robbie Rogers, Brek Shea, Jonathan Spector, Jose Torres and Chris Wondolowski.

First place selections receive three points, second place two points and third place one.

Past winners of the award, until recently known as the Honda Player of the Year:  Hugo Perez, 1991; Eric Wynalda, 1992; Thomas Dooley, 1993; Marcelo Balboa, 1994; Alexi Lalas, 1995; Wynalda, 1996; Eddie Pope, 1997; Cobi Jones, 1998; Kasey Keller, 1999; Claudio Reyna, 2000; Earnie Stewart, 2001; Landon Donovan, 2002; Donovan, 2003; Donovan, 2004; Keller, 2005; Clint Dempsey, 2006; Donovan, 2007; Donovan, 2008; Donovan, 2009; Donovan, 2010.  [October 21]

Comment:  Who would you vote for?  Let us know.

Last year’s vote from here got it wrong.  Donovan won, with Bradley the runner-up and Dempsey the third-place finisher.  Our ballot went to Donovan, Bradley and Cherundolo.  So we need your help before our ballot is submitted in the middle of next week.

Give us a post and list your three top choices, in order.  And feel free to do some lobbying if you so choose.  Bear in mind that the award is for a player’s body of work for the year, so take into account a candidate’s performance for his club as well as his contributions to the U.S. team.

Update:  Dempsey won the award for the second time after being named first choice on nearly half of the ballots submitted by the 202 U.S. journalists who took part.  Howard was second and seven-time winner Donovan was third.  [November 2]



QUE PESADILLA

Mexico recovered from a two-goal deficit and roared to a 4-2 victory over the United States to win the 2011 Gold Cup before a Rose Bowl crowd of 93,420 and secure a berth in the 2013 FIFA Confederations Cup, the dress rehearsal before the 2014 World Cup in Brazil.

  The win gave El Tri, which met the Americans in the two previous Gold Cup finals, a second consecutive CONCACAF championship and its sixth overall.  U.S. goals by Michael Bradley and Landon Donovan were cancelled out before halftime by Pablo Barrera and Andres Guardado; Barrera put Mexico ahead for good in the 50th minute, and Giovani Dos Santos applied the clincher with a brilliant individual effort in the 76th.  [June 25]

Comment:  Kevin Crow, Dan Canter, Jeff Durgan, David Brcic, Winston DuBose, and Bruce Savage, and, later, David Vanole, Paul Caligiuri, Marcelo Balboa, Mark Dodd, even John Doyle. 

There was a time when the U.S. was known for turning out nothing but goalkeepers and defenders, starting with Bob Rigby, who didn’t even take up the sport until he was 15 and went on to help  the Philadelphia Atoms win the 1973 NASL championship.

Times have changed, and now the U.S. is so thin at the back that when it loses 32-year-old right back Steve Cherundolo to a left ankle sprain 11 minutes into Saturday’s game, it has to scramble its defense, moving left back Eric Lichaj to the right and inserting someone like Jonathan Bornstein on the left.   With that, goalkeeper Tim Howard could only watch the collapse of his overmatched buddies, Lichaj, Clarence Goodson, Carlos Boganegra and Bornstein.

At least the U.S. has been consistent over the past few years.  The pleasant surprise of this tournament was not a desperately needed defender but an attacker, young fella by the name of Adu.



THE USA, WITH ONE FOOT TIED BEHIND ITS BACK

The U.S. National Team, three days away from its Gold Cup opener, allowed two first-half goals by Santiago Cazorla and bowed to World Cup holder Spain, 4-0, in a friendly at Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, MA.

David Silva set up both Cazorla strikes as the Spaniards raced out to a three-goal lead against a starting American lineup loaded with second-line players.   [June 4]   

Comment:  Coach Bob Bradley may have been trying to rest his best ahead of the Gold Cup, but Spain exposed the hard fact that the U.S. has no depth.  It never has.  The U.S. has been 11 + 2 and nothing better for years.

Among the losers were youngsters like defenders Tim Ream and Eric Lichaj, who deserved to be surrounded with the strongest possible U.S. lineup, plus the American fans among the crowd of 64,121, who paid between $40 and $495 (not a misprint) for the privilege of watching less-than-the-USA’s-best thrown to the wolves.



TWO HAPPY BIRTHDAYS

A young, experimental U.S. National Team, defeated South Africa, 1-0, on a goal by substitute Juan Agudelo five minutes from time in a friendly at Green Point Stadium in Cape Town.

The U.S. starting lineup averaged only 10 1/2 caps, and four of coach Bob Bradley’s halftime substitutes were 20 years old or younger and making their international debut.  [November 18]

Comment:  No doubt Agudelo will still be celebrating his goal six days hence, when he marks his 18th birthday.  After all, the Colombian-born striker, set up brilliantly in the box by the Norwegian-born Mikkel Diskerud, is the youngest scorer in U.S. history, eclipsing Jozy Altidore.

A more impressive birthday boy, however, was U.S. right back Eric Lichaj, who turned 22 the day of the South Africa match.  Lichaj, whose parents were born in Poland and reared in America, earned his first cap as a sub in last month’s scoreless draw with Colombia, and he played a key role, along with goalkeeper Brad Guzan, in keeping the American net clean.

Lichaj turned in the kind of performance–smart, strong, creative and utterly cool–that was sorely missing at times on the U.S. back line during the Americans’ last stay in South Africa.  All this despite playing the last hour with a yellow card.  Best of all, he covered ground like a young Thomas Dooley, popping up deep in the South African end on a regular basis.

It was only one match, but Lichaj (pronounced “LEE-hi”) showed off the qualities that inspired Aston Villa to sign him when he was a University of North Carolina freshman.  He’s just now breaking into the Villains’ starting lineup, but with the venerable Steve Cherundolo due to turn 35 when the next World Cup rolls around, it is hoped that Lichaj will be doing same for the U.S. over the next couple of years.