Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


2014: WORLD CUP MAKES IT TO No. 2 ON THE INTERNET

Google has released its 2014 list of most-searched subjects in America and abroad:

Global:

1.  Robin Williams

2.  World Cup

3.  Ebola

4.  Malaysia Airlines

5.  ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

6.  Flappy Bird

7.  Conchita Wurst

8.  ISIS

9.  Frozen

10.  Sochi Winter Olympics

 

United States:

1.  Robin Williams

2.  World Cup

3.  Ebola

4.  Malaysia Airlines

5.  Flappy Bird

6.  ALS Ice Bucket Challenge

7.  ISIS

8.  Ferguson

9.  Frozen

10.  Ukraine

[December 16]

 

Comment:  The World Cup in Brazil generated record television ratings in America–a cumulative viewership of 391.65 million.   Record activity on social media throughout the tournament, including 3-plus billion Facebook posts and 672-plus million tweets.  And now the No. 2 spot among the most-Googled subjects in America for the year.  Meanwhile, on the cover of Time magazine’s special issue, “The Year in Review,” along with photos of Pope Francis, Robin Williams, and those tending Ebola victims, was a shot of U.S. goalkeeper Tim Howard and Belgium’s Kevin Miralles doing battle at the World Cup.  Inside, the headline, “The Whole World is Watching,” above the subhead, “Move Over, Winter Olympics–Americans Join the Rest of the Planet in Making Soccer’s World Cup the Year’s Premier Sporting Event.”  (Interesting that the Winter Olympics didn’t make Google’s U.S. Top 10.)

Some dismissed the inroads made by the sport here in 2014 with, “Sure, a lot of Americans paid attention to soccer, but it’s only every four years, during a World Cup.”  Indeed, a lot paid attention last summer.  But those numbers dwarfed those for 2010, and 2010 dwarfed those for 2006, and those for 2002, when the U.S. nearly made it to the semifinals.

In this country, as usual, the Super Bowl back in early February was our TV behemoth, with a biggest-ever 111.5 million viewers and a 46.4 rating.  It impacted about one-third of America for one primetime evening, for at least those who were actually watching the Seattle Seahawks’ 43-8 blowout of the Denver Broncos, not those who were in the vicinity, zeroing in on the commercials between bites of Doritos with guacamole, handfuls of cheese doodles and chugs of Bud Light, or, at other Super Bowl parties, pate de fois gras canapés and sips of Chardonnay.   But the 2014 World Cup was a party that saturated an entire month, captivating viewers over 64 matches, 90 minutes at a time.

So, how big a leap forward was this year’s World Cup in the eyes of those who help determine what you see and hear?  Here’s what, in an Associate Press vote of 94 U.S. editors and news directors, were the top 10 sports stories of the year:

Associated Press:

1.  NFL Domestic Violence

2.  Clippers’ Sterling Banned

3.  LeBron Goes Home

4.  Firsts for Gay Athletes

5.  Giants Win World Series

6.  College Football Playoff Pays Off

7.  Tony Stewart

8.  World Cup

9.  Seahawks Win Super Bowl

10.  Sochi Olympics

 

The answer, obviously, is somewhat.

Advertisements


WOULD A 92ND GOAL HAVE HELPED?

Olympic swimming great Michael Phelps has been named the 2012 Associated Press Male Athlete of the Year, the AP has announced.

Phelps, who won six more medals at last summer’s London Olympic Games to bring his career medal haul to 22, including 18 golds, got 40 votes in balloting by 100 U.S. editors and broadcasters to out-poll basketball’s LeBron James, with 37, and Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt, with 23.

Phelps joins track’s Carl Lewis as the only Olympic-related athlete to win the AP honor twice.  Golfer Tiger Woods and cyclist Lance Armstrong have won the award four times each, and basketball’s Michael Jordan is a three-time winner.  [December 20]

Comment:  The elephant not in this room, of course, is Argentina and FC Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi, whose 91 goals for club and country in all competitions during the calendar year broke the 40-year-old record of 85 set by West Germany and Bayern Munich poacher extraodinaire Gerd Muller.

The AP has been doing this since 1931, and it has rarely looked beyond its own shores, let alone smiled on a soccer player.  This is a group of sports editors and sportscasters that in 2000 voted on the best 100 athletes of the 20th Century.  The only soccer player was Pele, who was No. 15–six places below female multi-sport standout Babe Didrikson Zaharias.  No Alfredo Di Stefano.  No Ferenc Puskas.  No Eusebio.  No George Best.  No Franz Beckenbauer.  No Johan Cruyff.  No Zico.  No Michel Platini.  No Diego Maradona.  No Roberto Baggio.  (For the record, at the top of the AP heap was Babe Ruth, followed by Jordan, Jim Thorpe, Muhammed Ali and Wayne Gretzky.  The race horse Secretariat came in 81st.)

But before outraged soccer fans here throw up their hands, there’s this story, released a day before the Phelps announcement, by the same Associated Press:

BUENOS AIRES (AP) — Argentine journalists don’t think Lionel Messi is the country’s best athlete for 2012.

Argentine boxer Sergio Martinez was awarded the title of “Olimpia de Oro,” given to the South American country’s top athlete in voting by the Circulo de Periodistas–or association of journalists.

Martinez defeated Mexican boxer Julio Cesar Chavez Jr. earlier this year in their WBC title fight.

Barcelona star Messi, who has had a record-breaking year with 90 goals, didn’t even finish second in the voting.  That went to Sebastian Crismanich, the taekwondo  fighter who won Argentina’s only gold medal in the London Olympics.  Messi finished third.