Soccerstoriesbook's Blog


AN UNTHINKABLE WORLD CUP

ISIS militants executed 13 teen-aged boys in Islamic State-controlled Mosul for watching the 2015 Asian Cup first-round match between Iraq and Jordan.

The youngsters were caught in the Al-Yarmouk district taking in the match being televised from Brisbane, Australia.  Accused of violating Sharia law, they were rounded up and, after their crime was announced over loudspeaker, machine-gunned to death in a public execution.  Family members did not immediately recover the bodies out of fear of murder by ISIS gunmen.  [January 12]

Comment:  The 2022 World Cup will be held in Qatar.  The tiny Middle Eastern state on the Persian Gulf was selected host nation in a vote of the FIFA Executive Committee in 2010 that had a strong odor to it and left runners-up the U.S., Australia, Japan and South Korea dumbfounded.  Since then, concerns over the heat in Qatar in June and July–the traditional World Cup months–have stirred speculation that the event would be shifted to December-January for the first time ever, a move that would turn many of the world’s club schedules upside down.  And, most recently, the release of the report of an investigation into suspicions that the Qataris bought the Executive Committee has been stonewalled by FIFA.  But if matches played in 107-degree temperatures and bald corruption aren’t enough to prompt FIFA to reconsider its decision to risk its prime jewel (a.k.a., its prime cash cow), perhaps it’s this heinous execution in Mosul.

As the Qatari delegation asked of the Executive Committee in its final pitch to become the ’22 host nation, “When?”  When would a World Cup be awarded to a region that is as passionate about soccer as any on the planet?  But the turmoil in that part of the world continues to grow, and with it the fear that if ISIS is ultimately defeated over the next few years, another extreme Islamist force will take its place.  And, as these ISIS monsters demonstrated, while soccer is blithely called a religion around the world, to a few on the edge of sanity, to them it’s an anti-religion.

That raises the formerly unthinkable prospect that a World Cup could be a prime target of terrorists–namely, Qatar ’22.  Previously, it was easy to believe that the World Cup was immune to any sort of attack because of soccer’s sky-high popularity.  The Black September massacre of Israeli wrestlers at the 1972 Munich Summer Games shattered the image of the Olympics as a joyous festival of global goodwill–and turned the planet against the terrorists behind it.  But today’s terrorists doesn’t care.  We’ve seen through the beheadings and the summary execution of boys that they have no public relations department and don’t want one.  If they enrage soccer fans around the globe, they’ve made their point in the strongest possible terms.  Worse still, they may be able to reach New York, London, Madrid, and Tokyo, but striking in their own backyard is so much easier.  And that should be cause for concern at FIFA headquarters in Zurich.  This latest atrocity was committed in Mosul.  That’s only 910 miles from Doha, the capital of Qatar.

For the record:  Iraq, whose soccer triumphs have united the country like nothing else, beat Jordan that day, 1-0, and later finished second in its Asian Cup group to advance to the quarterfinals, where it edged arch rival Iran on penalty kicks, 7-6, after a 3-3 draw.  The Iraqis succumbed in the semifinals to South Korea, 2-0, in Sydney.

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THE POSSIBLE ‘ACCOMMODATION’

The USA’s draw with Portugal in the second game of Group “G” play created all sorts of intrigue because a tie between the Americans and their last first-round opponent, Germany, would see both teams into the second round at the expense of Portugal and Ghana.

The web is beyond tangled:  The U.S. is coached by Juergen Klinsmann, who as a player helped Germany win the 1990 World Cup and coached Germany to a surprise third-place finish in 2006; Klinsmann resides in Huntington Beach, Calif., with his American wife and American-reared children; the U.S. squad features five players who have American fathers and German mothers and were largely raised in Germany; four of those five play in the Bundesliga and most of those five were coaxed into a USA jersey by Klinsmann; Germany’s coach, Joachim Loew was Klinsmann’s trusted top assistant in 2006; and five current Germany players–Bastian Schweinsteiger, Philipp Lahm, Per Mertesacker, Lukas Podolski and, of course, Miroslav Klose–called Klinsmann “boss” eight years ago.

So, rather than a series of haymakers, would the U.S. and Germany come to an “arrangement” and take it easy, playing to a draw that would assure group-favorite Germany a first-place finish in Group “G” and the Americans the coveted second-place finish in the so-called “Group of Death”?

Klinsmann, immediately after the tie with Portugal, dismissed any suggestion that he’d ask a favor of his old deputy.

“There’s no such call,” Klinsmann said.  “Jogi is doing his job and I’m doing my job.  I’m going to do everything to get to the round of 16.  There’s no time to have friendship calls.  It’s about business now.”  [June 24]

Comment:  What you’ll be hearing about from now until Thursday morning, and possibly all the way into halftime in Recife, from Soccer Stories:  Anecdotes, Oddities, Lore and Amazing Feats:

“The 1982 World Cup in Spain kicked off with 24 finalists–an increase of eight from Argentina ’78–and a format in which the winners and runners-up from the eight four-team groups would move on as well as the four best third-place finishers.  Nevertheless, FIFA … failed to give the last two matches in each group the same kickoff time.  In fact, it didn’t even have the last games of each group played on the same day.

“Algeria, a Group 2 longshot, pulled off an early stunner in Gijon when it upset West Germany, 2-1, in its opener.  The Algerians lost to Austria, 2-0, in Oviedo five days later but closed out their first-round slate by beating Chile, 3-2, also in Oviedo.  That result left the North Africans tied on points with Austria and two ahead of West Germany; on goal difference, the Germans and Austrians were both +2 and the Algerians 0.  [Until 1994, a win was worth just two points, not three; a tie, the customary one.]

“The next day in Gijon, six days shy of the 20th anniversary of Algeria’s independence, West Germany and Austria met in Group 2’s last match and engaged in the biggest farce in World Cup history.

“The Germans opened the scoring in the 10th minute on a header by hulking striker Horst Hrubesch.  Knowing that a 1-0 West German win would see the two neighbors through at Algeria’s expense, the Germans and Austrians proceeded to aimlessly pass the ball around for the next 80 minutes.  Algerian supporters on hand, convinced the match was fixed, booed and whistled in disgust; some tried to invade the field to halt the game.  In the stands, a West German burned his nation’s flag.

“FIFA rejected out of hand an Algerian call to disqualify West Germany and Austria on sportsmanship grounds, and Algeria’s first World Cup adventure ended in bitter disappointment.  Final group standings (with goal differential):  West Germany 2-1-0 (+3), Austria 2-1-0 (+2), Algeria 2-1-0 (0), and Chile 0-3-0 (-5).

“West Germany later bowed to Italy, 3-1, in the final in Madrid.  Austria lost to France and tied Northern Ireland in its second-round group and was eliminated.  Algeria qualified for Mexico ’86, crashed in the first round, and didn’t make it back to the World Cup for 24 years.

“How distasteful was the game derisively called a second German-Austrian anschluss?  French coach Michel Hidalgo, anticipating a second-round meeting with the Austrians, scouted the match and didn’t take a single note.  Hidaldo later suggested that the two sides be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.”

It was all so perfect–and perfectly repugnant.  However, this time, it may become an impossibility because of the competitiveness of the two sides, starting with master (Klinsmann) and student (Loew).  Not to mention a bit more international scrutiny that didn’t exist 32 years ago.